I write about nerdy things, and celebrate those things as a college writing teacher.

Posts tagged with ‘on comics writing’

To me, the good high concepts are not the maybe the Hollywood logline. For me, coming up with a good science fiction high concept, which is what I do a lot of, is about finding the mirror. It’s about finding what is the human story that you can tell with that little bit of science fiction. On, say, existence — you have the logline, which would be “a physicist finds himself transferred into the body of the hitman that just killed him, and now he has to solve his own murder.”

— Nick Spencer, from this Writer’s Workshop at Newsarama. This is a long read, but worth it if you’re a writer of any kind but especially if you want to be in comics. It’s alot of process, but there is quite a bit of valuable stuff, especially the stuff about the Mort Numbers which is something I kinda-sorta figured out the hard way.

theodoredow:

Never give up. 

That phrase is crucial to all success. 

theodoredow:

Never give up. 

That phrase is crucial to all success. 

(via alexanderthejustokay)

Using Fountain to write comics (and games?) →

antonyjohnston:

I’ve been fascinated by the possibilities of Fountain since it launched.

Here’s a long post where I talk about using it to write comics , complete with samples and a template. Enjoy.

Interesting. 

(via mattfractionblog)

Kelly Sue DeConnick's Advice on Getting Started in Comics

  • : Find a collaborator and start producing mini-comics;
  • : Produce a full-length script;
  • : Read as many scripts as you can get your hands on -- here's a free resource http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/
  • : Take your favorite comics and reverse engineer them -- try to produce the script that would have resulted in that book;
  • : Take the worst comic you can find and reverse engineer it. What went wrong?
  • : Pick three artists whose work you admire and whose styles are different. :Write the same short script for those three different artists. Analyze your choices;
  • : Read books on craft.
  • Good advice.

(Source: brianwood, via robot6)

twiststreet:

This came up the other day— Alan Moore’s chart for Big Numbers, tracking the plot as it relates to each character in the story, per issue.  Each row is a character, and each column is an issue. The project was never fully realized for various reasons (and/or cocaine).  As I understand it, this is a shrunk down version of the original.

Well, here is a master class.
I should be all over this sort of thing, and I do desperately want it, but I’m constantly putting things up for debate vs a car. So book or car? So, for now, the answer has always been—car. And yes I do feel like an imposter.

twiststreet:

This came up the other day— Alan Moore’s chart for Big Numbers, tracking the plot as it relates to each character in the story, per issue.  Each row is a character, and each column is an issue. The project was never fully realized for various reasons (and/or cocaine).  As I understand it, this is a shrunk down version of the original.

Well, here is a master class.

I should be all over this sort of thing, and I do desperately want it, but I’m constantly putting things up for debate vs a car. So book or car? So, for now, the answer has always been—car. And yes I do feel like an imposter.

Larry Hama's Rules for Writing Comics. →

The Hidden Language of Comic Book Writers at VICE United States:

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Brackets denote paraphrasing. Everything else is in Fred Van Lente’s words.
Done-in-one: n. A single-issue story.
Anthology: n. A collection of stories by a variety of creative teams.
Miniseries: n. A comics title with a definitive endpoint, usually three to six issues.
Maxiseries: n. The same as a mini-series, only eight to 12 issues. Usage: Used heavily in the 1980s. The most famous maxiseries of all time is Watchmen, which originally ran as 12 serialized issues.
Title: n. Synonym for “series,” e.g., Amazing Spider-Man, Detective Comics.
Line: n. An imprint connecting a particular set of titles under a specific form of branding, e.g., Marvel Adventures [presents stories for] younger readers.
Universe: n. A set of titles connected by the characters all operating in the same world.
Crossover: n. A storyline that goes across multiple titles. Usually, these days, a crossover has its own title (an “event book”) as well. The first comic book crossover was 1940’s Marvel Mystery Comics #8. The two most popular features, Human Torch and Submariner, fought each other. From that moment on, [crossovers] became standard operating procedure.
Classical crossover: n. Two books [intersecting]
Event: n. [A crossover] that’s happening to the entire universe, the entire line, simultaneously. Almost all the titles participate in that.
Event Book: n. A miniseries or maxiseries [containing the central story of an event].
Tie-in: n. The individual issue or issues of an [ongoing] title that link into a specific event (unique to events as opposed to crossovers).
Red Skies Event: n. A disparaging term meaning [a book is linked to] a tie-in just to trick somebody into buying it. Etymology: A reference to Crisis on Infinite Earths, when all the skies in the DC titles [became] red.
Continuity: n. The idea that each story is a building block of a larger fictional universe.
Reboot: n. When take a pre-existing franchise [or fictional universe] and you wipe everything that happened clean and you start from scratch [usually with the same characters]. Most reboots are also a relaunch. e.g., Casino Royale [is a reboot of the James Bond franchise.]
Soft Reboot (or In-Continuity Reboot): n. When you change some [details] but not others. It’s usually contained to certain characters within an ongoing continuity, e.g., Spider-Man: One More Day, where Mephisto, using his demonic powers, managed to undo Mary Jane and Peter’s marriage so that nobody had memory of it.
Full Reboot: n. Rebooting the entire line.
Relaunch: n. When you take an existing franchise—you do not break from continuity—and you start it over with a new #1, usually just an excuse to get new eyes on the series.
Retcon: n. Short for “retroactive continuity.” A “fix” or “patch” to continuity that smooths over something that happened that either the writer doesn’t like, or wasn’t interesting, or doesn’t support the current story.
Death (of a character): n. A kick in the ass to continuity. It’s peaks and valleys. You kill somebody off, you’re getting a lot of eyes on that. Then when you bring them back, you’re getting a lot of eyes on that. The only unkillable character is the one with extremely good sales.
First Appearance: n. [The comic in which a character is] first seen, e.g., in Batman’s first appearance, called “The Case of the Criminal Syndicate,” it was never explained who he was.
Origin Story: n. [The story in which we see] where a character came from. (Note: Many origins are also first appearances. In Spider-Man’s first appearance, [Amazing Fantasy #15], you meet Peter Parker, he gets bitten by a radioactive spider, and Uncle Ben gets shot.)
Pacing: n. The rate at which storytellers dole out “beats,” or distinct movements of story progression. [Early] comics were about 64 pages long and had four to eight stories per issue. In the mid 60s, [Marvel] pioneered stretching out stories across multiple issues when their heavy hitters, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, wanted to flex their storytelling muscles in titles like Fantastic Four and Dr. Strange. Now story pacing is set by the current economics of the market, which is four to six issues followed by a collected edition.
Decompression: n. Dragging the story out way longer than it really [deserves], partly to sell more comics, partly to lessen the burden of the creative team.
Idle: n. The curse word of comics. Idle means no one’s working, meaning a penciller doesn’t have script, an inker doesn’t have pencils, a colorist doesn’t have inks, a letterer doesn’t have pencils. It almost always results in a domino effect.
Six-Month Week: n. It takes a penciller six weeks to finish [each] issue. You start 12 weeks in advance. What that means is that, in four to five issues, that artist will have to be replaced.
THE TAKEAWAY
As popular culture continues to recycle and regurgitate itself, knowing the difference between a reboot and a soft relaunch might come in handy. These narrative terms are also fun to apply in the real world: Compare your friend’s first appearances to their origin stories. Or relaunch your life by quitting your job, moving to a new apartment, and legally changing your name. And idle is a handy way to describe any workflow problem that throws a whole system off, resulting in a waste of time or a late, cold pizza.

The Hidden Language of Comic Book Writers at VICE United States:

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Brackets denote paraphrasing. Everything else is in Fred Van Lente’s words.

Done-in-one: n. A single-issue story.

Anthology: n. A collection of stories by a variety of creative teams.

Miniseries: n. A comics title with a definitive endpoint, usually three to six issues.

Maxiseries: n. The same as a mini-series, only eight to 12 issues. Usage: Used heavily in the 1980s. The most famous maxiseries of all time is Watchmen, which originally ran as 12 serialized issues.

Title: n. Synonym for “series,” e.g., Amazing Spider-Man, Detective Comics.

Line: n. An imprint connecting a particular set of titles under a specific form of branding, e.g., Marvel Adventures [presents stories for] younger readers.

Universe: n. A set of titles connected by the characters all operating in the same world.

Crossover: n. A storyline that goes across multiple titles. Usually, these days, a crossover has its own title (an “event book”) as well. The first comic book crossover was 1940’s Marvel Mystery Comics #8. The two most popular features, Human Torch and Submariner, fought each other. From that moment on, [crossovers] became standard operating procedure.

Classical crossover: n. Two books [intersecting]

Event: n. [A crossover] that’s happening to the entire universe, the entire line, simultaneously. Almost all the titles participate in that.

Event Book: n. A miniseries or maxiseries [containing the central story of an event].

Tie-in: n. The individual issue or issues of an [ongoing] title that link into a specific event (unique to events as opposed to crossovers).

Red Skies Event: n. A disparaging term meaning [a book is linked to] a tie-in just to trick somebody into buying it. Etymology: A reference to Crisis on Infinite Earths, when all the skies in the DC titles [became] red.

Continuity: n. The idea that each story is a building block of a larger fictional universe.

Reboot: n. When take a pre-existing franchise [or fictional universe] and you wipe everything that happened clean and you start from scratch [usually with the same characters]. Most reboots are also a relaunch. e.g., Casino Royale [is a reboot of the James Bond franchise.]

Soft Reboot (or In-Continuity Reboot): n. When you change some [details] but not others. It’s usually contained to certain characters within an ongoing continuity, e.g., Spider-Man: One More Day, where Mephisto, using his demonic powers, managed to undo Mary Jane and Peter’s marriage so that nobody had memory of it.

Full Reboot: n. Rebooting the entire line.

Relaunch: n. When you take an existing franchise—you do not break from continuity—and you start it over with a new #1, usually just an excuse to get new eyes on the series.

Retcon: n. Short for “retroactive continuity.” A “fix” or “patch” to continuity that smooths over something that happened that either the writer doesn’t like, or wasn’t interesting, or doesn’t support the current story.

Death (of a character): n. A kick in the ass to continuity. It’s peaks and valleys. You kill somebody off, you’re getting a lot of eyes on that. Then when you bring them back, you’re getting a lot of eyes on that. The only unkillable character is the one with extremely good sales.

First Appearance: n. [The comic in which a character is] first seen, e.g., in Batman’s first appearance, called “The Case of the Criminal Syndicate,” it was never explained who he was.

Origin Story: n. [The story in which we see] where a character came from. (Note: Many origins are also first appearances. In Spider-Man’s first appearance, [Amazing Fantasy #15], you meet Peter Parker, he gets bitten by a radioactive spider, and Uncle Ben gets shot.)

Pacing: n. The rate at which storytellers dole out “beats,” or distinct movements of story progression. [Early] comics were about 64 pages long and had four to eight stories per issue. In the mid 60s, [Marvel] pioneered stretching out stories across multiple issues when their heavy hitters, Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, wanted to flex their storytelling muscles in titles like Fantastic Four and Dr. Strange. Now story pacing is set by the current economics of the market, which is four to six issues followed by a collected edition.

Decompression: n. Dragging the story out way longer than it really [deserves], partly to sell more comics, partly to lessen the burden of the creative team.

Idle: n. The curse word of comics. Idle means no one’s working, meaning a penciller doesn’t have script, an inker doesn’t have pencils, a colorist doesn’t have inks, a letterer doesn’t have pencils. It almost always results in a domino effect.

Six-Month Week: n. It takes a penciller six weeks to finish [each] issue. You start 12 weeks in advance. What that means is that, in four to five issues, that artist will have to be replaced.

THE TAKEAWAY

As popular culture continues to recycle and regurgitate itself, knowing the difference between a reboot and a soft relaunch might come in handy. These narrative terms are also fun to apply in the real world: Compare your friend’s first appearances to their origin stories. Or relaunch your life by quitting your job, moving to a new apartment, and legally changing your name. And idle is a handy way to describe any workflow problem that throws a whole system off, resulting in a waste of time or a late, cold pizza.