I write about nerdy things, and celebrate those things as a college writing teacher. I live in the mountains and co-founded the production house ADK Mogul.

Posts tagged with ‘on comics writing’

To me, the good high concepts are not the maybe the Hollywood logline. For me, coming up with a good science fiction high concept, which is what I do a lot of, is about finding the mirror. It’s about finding what is the human story that you can tell with that little bit of science fiction. On, say, existence — you have the logline, which would be “a physicist finds himself transferred into the body of the hitman that just killed him, and now he has to solve his own murder.”

— Nick Spencer, from this Writer’s Workshop at Newsarama. This is a long read, but worth it if you’re a writer of any kind but especially if you want to be in comics. It’s alot of process, but there is quite a bit of valuable stuff, especially the stuff about the Mort Numbers which is something I kinda-sorta figured out the hard way.

theodoredow:

Never give up. 

That phrase is crucial to all success. 

theodoredow:

Never give up. 

That phrase is crucial to all success. 

(via alexanderthejustokay)

Using Fountain to write comics (and games?) →

antonyjohnston:

I’ve been fascinated by the possibilities of Fountain since it launched.

Here’s a long post where I talk about using it to write comics , complete with samples and a template. Enjoy.

Interesting. 

(via mattfractionblog)

Kelly Sue DeConnick's Advice on Getting Started in Comics

  • : Find a collaborator and start producing mini-comics;
  • : Produce a full-length script;
  • : Read as many scripts as you can get your hands on -- here's a free resource http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/
  • : Take your favorite comics and reverse engineer them -- try to produce the script that would have resulted in that book;
  • : Take the worst comic you can find and reverse engineer it. What went wrong?
  • : Pick three artists whose work you admire and whose styles are different. :Write the same short script for those three different artists. Analyze your choices;
  • : Read books on craft.
  • Good advice.

(Source: brianwood, via robot6)

twiststreet:

This came up the other day— Alan Moore’s chart for Big Numbers, tracking the plot as it relates to each character in the story, per issue.  Each row is a character, and each column is an issue. The project was never fully realized for various reasons (and/or cocaine).  As I understand it, this is a shrunk down version of the original.

Well, here is a master class.
I should be all over this sort of thing, and I do desperately want it, but I’m constantly putting things up for debate vs a car. So book or car? So, for now, the answer has always been—car. And yes I do feel like an imposter.

twiststreet:

This came up the other day— Alan Moore’s chart for Big Numbers, tracking the plot as it relates to each character in the story, per issue.  Each row is a character, and each column is an issue. The project was never fully realized for various reasons (and/or cocaine).  As I understand it, this is a shrunk down version of the original.

Well, here is a master class.

I should be all over this sort of thing, and I do desperately want it, but I’m constantly putting things up for debate vs a car. So book or car? So, for now, the answer has always been—car. And yes I do feel like an imposter.

Larry Hama's Rules for Writing Comics. →