I write about nerdy things, and celebrate those things as a college writing teacher.

Posts tagged with ‘hawkguy’

From HAWKEYE #6 by Matt Fraction and David Aja.
My Dad and I just read this and we both had a good hearty laugh at Clint Barton struggling with the damn remotes for his newfangled HD TV because it’s something we struggle through EVERY DAMN NIGHT. 

From HAWKEYE #6 by Matt Fraction and David Aja.

My Dad and I just read this and we both had a good hearty laugh at Clint Barton struggling with the damn remotes for his newfangled HD TV because it’s something we struggle through EVERY DAMN NIGHT. 

More than anything else, I really love David Aja’s page and design sense in HAWKEYE #6. Alot of people have been fawning over it and I have to say this page pretty much blows my socks off. 
Digitally speaking, I feel like quite a bit is lost aesthetically especially reading this on a laptop, but who can say about an iPad or any other device. Regardless, I feel like holding a physical copy of this page would be preferable over any other format. 

More than anything else, I really love David Aja’s page and design sense in HAWKEYE #6. Alot of people have been fawning over it and I have to say this page pretty much blows my socks off. 

Digitally speaking, I feel like quite a bit is lost aesthetically especially reading this on a laptop, but who can say about an iPad or any other device. Regardless, I feel like holding a physical copy of this page would be preferable over any other format. 

.mattfraction: $724.58 →

mattfractionblog:

image
was how much cash you guys put into the bucket at last week.
In fact, Team #Hawkguy, you guys have inspired me — I’m gonna donate my page rate from the issue, too.
In other words — every dime I’ve made or will make from #Hawkguy 7, I’m giving to the Red Cross for Sandy recovery.

Matt Fraction is just world class. A truly kind move, and I’m proud to say that my $2.99 is a part of this classy move. 

From Hawkeye #8 by Matt Fraction and David Aja. I was wondering when we’d get to this joke. 

From Hawkeye #8 by Matt Fraction and David Aja. I was wondering when we’d get to this joke. 

(Source: comixology.com)

#Hawkguy seen in the wild. (at The Bookstore Plus)

#Hawkguy seen in the wild. (at The Bookstore Plus)

Kate, you’re great. 

From HAWKEYE #10 by Matt Fraction and Francisco Francavilla. 
Digitally speaking this doesn’t quite work, because Francavilla’s panels want to bleed together so while reading this in Guided View it feels like I’m missing the flow of the page.
This point here, the one up top? That’s really, really, really true about New York. It’s probably really why I didn’t want to be there anymore, because it always felt like wheels spinning—the transitory nature of it rather than a stillness, creating a lack of appreciation—stimuli overdoses. Here I appreciate small things, like a one year old make a tour of a living room, making a fire, and even gardening. Sharing ghost stories with my class. It forces you to take a second and appreciate the silent moments rather than the shiny. 
Things feel more permanent in the woods rather than Manhattan.

From HAWKEYE #10 by Matt Fraction and Francisco Francavilla. 

Digitally speaking this doesn’t quite work, because Francavilla’s panels want to bleed together so while reading this in Guided View it feels like I’m missing the flow of the page.

This point here, the one up top? That’s really, really, really true about New York. It’s probably really why I didn’t want to be there anymore, because it always felt like wheels spinning—the transitory nature of it rather than a stillness, creating a lack of appreciation—stimuli overdoses. Here I appreciate small things, like a one year old make a tour of a living room, making a fire, and even gardening. Sharing ghost stories with my class. It forces you to take a second and appreciate the silent moments rather than the shiny. 

Things feel more permanent in the woods rather than Manhattan.

wilwheaton:

joebagofdoughnuts:

I don’t even like Hawkeye and I thought this was cool.

#TEAMHAWKGUY!

(Source: starkexpo)

My favorite books from 2013 were:
Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan
The Circle by Dave Eggers
The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins
Hawkeye by Matt Fraction, David Aja, et. al
Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples
There was a quite a bit of good reading from last year, my favorites were genre.
My favorite story from Sullivan’s collection was about animals taking over the planet and waging holy war on the humans. The Circle made me re-evaluate my usage of social networks. It was a little heavy-handed, but I don’t think posting about my personal life is something that I care about. This book was also coincidental, because when I was teaching my first year seminar (FYS) on our use of technology and how it’s part of this “new age of expression” (as some would celebrate it, but I’m not one of those people) made me think about my use of the internet.
Really, reading Bill Bryson’s A Walk In The Woods, helped me come to realize that what we are in is an age of convenience—not expression.Talking about it with my really great FYS class, helped me come to realize that books are really the best form of expression and talking about modern age. So if I’m going to teach FYS next year, I think I’ll couple The Circle with Wild by Cheryl Strayed or Bryson’s book. This is why my blog will mostly go back to its original state. It’ll exist exclusively as a notebook, a scrapbook of gathering research rather than a life-blog, because—let’s be honest—I’m fucking boring. But the stuff I like isn’t.

My favorite books from 2013 were:

Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan

The Circle by Dave Eggers

The Hunger Games series by Suzanne Collins

Hawkeye by Matt Fraction, David Aja, et. al

Saga by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

There was a quite a bit of good reading from last year, my favorites were genre.

My favorite story from Sullivan’s collection was about animals taking over the planet and waging holy war on the humans. The Circle made me re-evaluate my usage of social networks. It was a little heavy-handed, but I don’t think posting about my personal life is something that I care about. This book was also coincidental, because when I was teaching my first year seminar (FYS) on our use of technology and how it’s part of this “new age of expression” (as some would celebrate it, but I’m not one of those people) made me think about my use of the internet.

Really, reading Bill Bryson’s A Walk In The Woods, helped me come to realize that what we are in is an age of convenience—not expression.Talking about it with my really great FYS class, helped me come to realize that books are really the best form of expression and talking about modern age. So if I’m going to teach FYS next year, I think I’ll couple The Circle with Wild by Cheryl Strayed or Bryson’s book. This is why my blog will mostly go back to its original state. It’ll exist exclusively as a notebook, a scrapbook of gathering research rather than a life-blog, because—let’s be honest—I’m fucking boring. But the stuff I like isn’t.

Transcript of Matt Fraction on LiveWire 241 →

This is quite the story about a man and his dog.

(Source: missbuster)