I write about nerdy things, and celebrate those things as a college writing teacher.

Posts tagged with ‘Digital Comics’

If you’re a process nerd like me, you owe it to yourself to pay whatever the hell you want for this eighty-five page document on how Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin developed THE PRIVATE EYE. 
I was thinking this morning that I’ll probably integrate this comic into my seminar class as a kind of counterpoint to Harkaway’s The Blind Giant. 

If you’re a process nerd like me, you owe it to yourself to pay whatever the hell you want for this eighty-five page document on how Brian K. Vaughan and Marcos Martin developed THE PRIVATE EYE. 

I was thinking this morning that I’ll probably integrate this comic into my seminar class as a kind of counterpoint to Harkaway’s The Blind Giant

To hold us over while Vaughan is producing the UNDER THE DOME tv series, here’s Marcos Martin’s cover to The Private Eye #3.
Obviously, this is my favorite digital comic. 

To hold us over while Vaughan is producing the UNDER THE DOME tv series, here’s Marcos Martin’s cover to The Private Eye #3.

Obviously, this is my favorite digital comic. 

twiststreet:

Talking about how a contract works without talking about why those are the best contracts your industry manages to offer after it has earned literally billions of dollars off of your and other people’s sweat equity is absolutely a work of fucking genius, at least under certain definitions of genius, definitions not contained in any dictionary known to man. 

I think Abhay is referring to this, and the contrivance of Waid’s remarks. The whole thing smacks of “Welp, that’s just business, and I hate business! And at one point the Bud Selig of comics [woah] was doing a solid, but if you want to play the game this is how it is and you just have to be okay with it. I’m okay with it.”

Did you like the scene in Batman Begins where young Bruce Wayne climbs a Himalayan mountain holding a blue flower? Christopher Priest got paid for having come up with that. Or the scene where Bruce Wayne picks out a potential Batmobile from among his own holdings? That was lifted from a Chuck Dixon-written comic, and Paul sent Dixon a check to acknowledge that. Same with dozens of similar moments in cartoons, DVDs, and so forth and so on. It wasn’t legally necessary, it was totally at Paul’s discretion and only Paul knows what math he used to determine what he felt would be fair, but it was a goodwill gesture from an exec sympathetic to the creative community.
And most critically, it wasn’t a written policy or guarantee. It was a courtesy.
Once Paul left, that courtesy was deemed no longer necessary by the executives and the policy was rolled back, as was DC’s absolute prerogative…

No, that’s not okay, which is what makes the Thrillbent thing interesting. It isn’t so much that the comics are interesting, though I like ‘em for the most part, it’s bearing witness to Waid realizing his contradictions. He’s still doing mainstream superhero books, and battling against that current model with Thrillbent. That’s the point of life isn’t it? To realize what’s wrong with yourself and actively trying to do something better, which is what I’m reading into the entire thing that is Thrillbent, and that’s why I applaud what Waid is trying to do.

twiststreet:

Talking about how a contract works without talking about why those are the best contracts your industry manages to offer after it has earned literally billions of dollars off of your and other people’s sweat equity is absolutely a work of fucking genius, at least under certain definitions of genius, definitions not contained in any dictionary known to man. 

I think Abhay is referring to this, and the contrivance of Waid’s remarks. The whole thing smacks of “Welp, that’s just business, and I hate business! And at one point the Bud Selig of comics [woah] was doing a solid, but if you want to play the game this is how it is and you just have to be okay with it. I’m okay with it.”

Did you like the scene in Batman Begins where young Bruce Wayne climbs a Himalayan mountain holding a blue flower? Christopher Priest got paid for having come up with that. Or the scene where Bruce Wayne picks out a potential Batmobile from among his own holdings? That was lifted from a Chuck Dixon-written comic, and Paul sent Dixon a check to acknowledge that. Same with dozens of similar moments in cartoons, DVDs, and so forth and so on. It wasn’t legally necessary, it was totally at Paul’s discretion and only Paul knows what math he used to determine what he felt would be fair, but it was a goodwill gesture from an exec sympathetic to the creative community.

And most critically, it wasn’t a written policy or guarantee. It was a courtesy.

Once Paul left, that courtesy was deemed no longer necessary by the executives and the policy was rolled back, as was DC’s absolute prerogative…

No, that’s not okay, which is what makes the Thrillbent thing interesting. It isn’t so much that the comics are interesting, though I like ‘em for the most part, it’s bearing witness to Waid realizing his contradictions. He’s still doing mainstream superhero books, and battling against that current model with Thrillbent. That’s the point of life isn’t it? To realize what’s wrong with yourself and actively trying to do something better, which is what I’m reading into the entire thing that is Thrillbent, and that’s why I applaud what Waid is trying to do.

ComiXology played itself, and its audience, over Saga #12 →

The second addendum I was thinking about this morning to the whole Saga vs Apple thing is exactly what Brothers says above and I alluded to, but did not go far enough: who is handling the standards and practices at ComiXology? To me, this thing sounds like a rookie mistake—it may be a simple misunderstanding on the part of a new hire. That’s probably too simplistic.

None of it matters—the fact remains this kind of thing only happened because of ComiXology’s practices. I’m not bagging to pile on, because I rely on this service to get SAGA and other independent books I don’t have access to anymore. I agree with Brothers that ComiXology is the new Diamond, and I think Waid gets to some truth of the matter as well. Now I’m fairly worried about my interaction with the company.

Follow-up from BKV: APPLE vs. SAGA #12. A follow-up to yesterday’s press release: I wanted to apologize to everyone for this entire SAGA #12 kerfuffle. Yesterday, I was mistakenly led to believe that this issue was solely with Apple, but it’s now clear that it was only ever Comixology too conservatively interpreting Apple’s rules. I’m truly sorry. I never thought either company was being homophobic, only weirdly inconsistent about what kind of adult material was permissible. I’m grateful that the situation was cleared up so quickly, and I’m delighted I can go back to reading smutty comics on my Retina Display iPad.

Brian K. Vaughan, via fionastaples.

What’s especially interesting is Fraction’s post as well:

Let me shape these two cents in the form of a question mark: in the wake of Brian and Marcos’ experiment with THE PRIVATE EYE last month (week? when? what is time?), have we not heard the bell tolling for digital middlemen, and if not, why the fuck not?


What I find oddly missing in this whole discussion is in the appearance that this digital comics thing only became a topic of conversation because it was bringing mainstream comics and “name” creators to the Internet, like the web needed validation. Why does it seem like there isn’t much credit being given to people who have long been doing digital comics? People like Kevin Church, Chris Onstag, and the Act-I-Vate crew were doing this thing, for free, with hardly any kerfuffle of this variety before there was a business model like ComiXology on the scene. The whole thing wreaks. 

(via mattfractionblog)

The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood by Christy Blanch and Chris Carr.

Embeddable comics, huh? Okay. What really gets me about this comic is I was in the interview process to teach in a prison, but I couldn’t do it because of my student loans, which prison officials consider them an avenue for convicts to blackmail me (yes seriously; I didn’t believe it either), so I didn’t get the job. And then I read this and see a reason that is pretty much why I couldn’t even enter the prison. Sure, I’ll suspend belief, because then I’m not sure how much of a story there would be in this strip. Other than the deeply personal relationships and stories that could come out of teaching an English class in a prison. Embeddable comics though. Neat.

The Private Eye, comic by Brian K. Vaughan & Marcos Martin at Panel Syndicate.
Oh my God, oh my God: 

Welcome to Panel Syndicate, where artist Marcos Martin and writer Brian K. Vaughan deliver original comics directly to readers around the world, who pay whatever the hell they want for each DRM-free issue. Our first new storyline is THE PRIVATE EYE, a forward-looking mystery we created with colorist Muntsa Vicente. Set in a future where privacy is considered a sacred right and everyone has a secret identity, The Private Eye is a serialized sci-fi detective story for mature readers. You can download our 32-page first issue right now, for any price you think is fair. 100% of your payments go directly into our greedy mitts and will help fund the rest of a story that we’re both very proud of (we hope there will be around 10 issues total; an old-school “maxiseries!”), so thanks for reading…

The Private Eye, comic by Brian K. Vaughan & Marcos Martin at Panel Syndicate.

Oh my God, oh my God: 

Welcome to Panel Syndicate, where artist Marcos Martin and writer Brian K. Vaughan deliver original comics directly to readers around the world, who pay whatever the hell they want for each DRM-free issue. Our first new storyline is THE PRIVATE EYE, a forward-looking mystery we created with colorist Muntsa Vicente. Set in a future where privacy is considered a sacred right and everyone has a secret identity, The Private Eye is a serialized sci-fi detective story for mature readers. You can download our 32-page first issue right now, for any price you think is fair. 100% of your payments go directly into our greedy mitts and will help fund the rest of a story that we’re both very proud of (we hope there will be around 10 issues total; an old-school “maxiseries!”), so thanks for reading…

MARK WAID » So I’m Asking For Your Help. →

I love that Waid is doing this.

For the last few months, a talented university teacher named Christy Blanch has been putting together a college-level course called “Gender Through Comic Books”–but it’s not limited to college students. It’s the world’s first comics-related Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)–meaning that it will be FREELY AVAILABLE to ANYONE across the world who has web access and who’s interested in comics and in the creative process. There’s no obligation, NO COST, and all you have to do is take thirty seconds to enroll at the following site:

As I’ve started teaching in the last year, I’ve been working out how I can bring comics into the classroom. It’s been a project of mine since last Spring, but I think I’ve finally got something solid. More soon. 

Mark Waid talking about digital comics and Thrillbent. I love this guy.

Chris Arrant talking with Warren Ellis on Digital Comics.

  • ARRANT: Something I wanted to ask you about is your thoughts on how the digital distribution of comics has, surprisingly enough, strengthened the format of the single-issue comic over longer-form works like graphic novels. What are your thoughts on digital comics and the way they’re served and read?
  • ELLIS: I’d be happier, I think, if the walled-garden services advertised their wares as “rentals.” Because if comiXology went away tomorrow, I wouldn’t have a clue how to prise my comics out of my iPad app, and I imagine many people may agree. Don’t get me wrong, I think comiXology is a good service, and I have no wish to single them out. But “rental for life of service” or some similar language would seem to me to be a clearer statement of the situation.