David Press

Apr 14

alexsegura:

Manhunter: The Special Edition (DC Comics - June 1999)
Writers: Archie Goodwin & Walt SimonsonIllustrator: Walt Simonson

This was recommended to me a couple of weeks ago and I really should get my hands on it.

alexsegura:

Manhunter: The Special Edition (DC Comics - June 1999)

Writers: Archie Goodwin & Walt Simonson
Illustrator: Walt Simonson

This was recommended to me a couple of weeks ago and I really should get my hands on it.

(Source: coolpages)

Apr 11

Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman’s home on Remodelista, because I’m in a nesting phase..

Michael Chabon and Ayelet Waldman’s home on Remodelista, because I’m in a nesting phase..

Apr 08

theparisreview:

Today in interesting mash-ups: Batman by Dostoyevsky. (via)

theparisreview:

Today in interesting mash-ups: Batman by Dostoyevsky. (via)

FFF Results Post #374 — Archie Goodwin, via The Comics Reporter:

On Friday, CR readers were asked to “Name Five Stories You Like Scripted By The Late Archie Goodwin.” This is how they responded.

Ahhh, this is helpful to my earlier question. 

FFF Results Post #374 — Archie Goodwin, via The Comics Reporter:
image

On Friday, CR readers were asked to “Name Five Stories You Like Scripted By The Late Archie Goodwin.” This is how they responded.

Ahhh, this is helpful to my earlier question. 

Apr 07

“Michael Chabon’s career is often the work of a writer hell-bent on destroying the line between “literary” and “genre,” and his most famous work is an epic adventure novel about comic-book creators. But I think Wonder Boys, while increasingly looking like a piece left over from a different puzzle, is still his best work. Chabon has said he responded deeply to Jonathan Yardley’s Washington Post review of Wonder Boys, where the critic challenged the author to “explore larger worlds” in his next work. And while this apparently spurred Chabon to write his Pulitzer-winning epic The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay I can’t help but wonder what might’ve been if Yardley hadn’t scrambled for something negative to say about Wonder Boys, or if Chabon hadn’t taken him so fucking literally.” —

Matt Debenham on Wonder Boys.

This movie and this book also had a profound impact on me. I was a freshman at St. Bonaventure University and my then-girlfriend (my first real relationship), and I went to see this. We had to wash down the taste of Fight Club, which disturbed and amazed us both so we went into this. By the end of this film, I couldn’t help but see so much of my future self in Grady Tripp. Was I going to end up like that guy? Being eighteen, I wanted to be Tobey Maguire’s character. Worse, I felt that I had to be, that anything less would be failure. And I think that’s quite a lot of what’s hung me up over the years is that need that the movie and book implanted. When it should have just been—do good work, rather than think about how you want to play pretend in someone else’s story. But this movie and then book was my introduction to Michael Chabon, someone who still shapes my writing life and someone I study as I make my way as an English teacher in higher education.

Apr 06

What was the next thing I read? Oh this interview with Chad Harbach. -

Are MFA programs asshole-making machines? The contributors Harbach has assembled for MFA vs NYC offer up some interesting answers to this question. They explore whether fiction programs can turn established writers into jaded teachers, cashing the paychecks necessary for writerly survival while caring little about students’ work. They consider whether MFAs can make talented younger writers into producers of bland, indistinguishable, commercially viable books. They explore the extent to which it might be better to stay in Iowa working on draft #143 of your masterpiece, rather than schmoozing at NYC publishing parties, and they ask—to quote from George Saunders’s own contribution to the book—whether, as MFA programs continue to proliferate, there’s “something gross about a culture telling a bunch of people who are never going to be artists that they maybe are, even if only by implication.”

What was it that grabbed me? I guess the system of turning out writers into writing teachers, a system I’m a part of, and seeing that as a necessary result. Teaching needs to happen, teaching how to help people communicate with one another and see another perspective is a necessary result to making a living. Just like garbage getting picked up, I’m getting paid to read other people’s writing, which helps me understand them and what they need to do well. It helps me understand what I need to do well so that I can support myself. Austin Kleon, talks about how you’re not entitled to do what you love, doing what you love creates a better life, but it doesn’t owe you financial success. Fortunately, I find myself at a crossroads where that’s not true. My job helps me be compassionate, and it spotlights when I’m being unreasonable. It trains me to recognize my ticks and spasms in other people and it’s so time-consuming that it provides a framework for finding the time for me and my art. That taking the time, the hour to sit down and write every day is necessary to my mental health, because the entire day can’t be all about other people. I don’t really care that much about whether the book I’m writing now will ever see a bookstore. It probably won’t, but it’s not something I’m worried about, it won’t see a bookstore if I don’t make an honest effort and try to get better.

I haven’t read MFA vs NYC, but I want to see if it talks about anything outside of these two paradigms, that there is space between these two literary powerhouses, because unfortunately it seems like the thesis is narrow.

“Soccer I actively hated. But it lasted only a few weeks, until I figured out that if you were too tired to keep playing, or if you had a cramp, you could raise your hand and the coach would pull you out. So as soon as he put me on, I would raise my hand. Once I did this and he yelled, from the sidelines, “Come on, John, goddamnit!” Our eyes met. I kept my hand in the air.” —

From johnjeremiahsullivan's Blood Horses

I woke up this morning at 4am. I’m staying at home with my parents to help pre-empt the flooding that always occurs during April. Mud season. We go right from awful March, my least favorite month, to April where there is mass flooding. It’s awesome.

I woke up and started reading John Jeremiah Sullivan’s Blood Horses, because I’m so into what it is he does. I really enjoy his work, and I can’t quite get enough of it. You know a writer is for you when you read something and say, “Yeah, me too.” I say that all the time when reading him and the thing I’m learning from him is compassion. A willingness to empathize with people, all people of various shapes and sizes, and their interests.

This quote literally sprang me from my bed, all of his sports-related anecdotes could have been pulled whole-cloth from my own athletic misadventures.     

Apr 03

Announcing The Wil Wheaton Project

wilwheaton:

Announcing The Wil Wheaton Project

About a year ago, I had a meeting with a production company, who wanted me to host a show for them. The concept was simple, I thought it had the potential to be incredibly funny, and I really liked the people I met with.

“I can’t just be a host, though,” I explained. “I’ve been producing Tabletop for two seasons, and if I’m going to be the public face of a show, I need to have a hand in its…

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This is fun, so much so I’ll go as far as looking at syfy’s website to watch this since I don’t have cable.

Apr 01

Archie Goodwin.

I’ve read his Alien adaptation with Walter Simonson, sent to me by the very kind martialartsmaven, but I’m looking for more to read.

What would you recommend? 

Idol.

Idol.