David Press's Notes.

Aug 19

[video]

Aug 16

Luke Cage was created in 1972.

Four years earlier, in 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr. was shot and killed.

Five years before that, in 1963, Medgar Evers was shot and killed.

Eight years before that, in 1955, a young Black man named Emmett Till was tortured, then shot and killed.

These events, and numerous others with frightening similarity, happened in a line, and in the early years of the first decade to reap the social benefits of the Civil Rights Movement, Marvel Comics gives the fans (and the world) a Black male superhero whose primary superhuman aspect… is that he’s bulletproof.

Not flight, or super speed, or a power ring.

The superhuman ability of being impervious to bullets.

Superheroes. Action heroes. Fantasy heroes.

Power fantasies.

Is there any doubt the power fantasy of the Black man in the years following multiple assassinations of his leaders and children by way of the gun would be superhuman resistance to bullets?

In American society, the Black man has come a long way from the terrors of the past handful of centuries, only to crash right into the terrors of the 21st century. Some of those terrors being the same exact ones their grandparents had to face and survive — or not.

There are Black men who are wealthy, powerful, formidable and/or dangerous. They can affect change undreamt of by their parents, and their parents’ parents. Their children will be able to change the world in ways we can intuit and others we can barely begin to try and predict.

But a bullet can rip through their flesh and their future with no effort whatsoever.

And so we look at Luke Cage, a man who gets shot on a regular basis, whose body language is such that he is expecting to be shot at, prepared for the impact — because he knows he can take it.

And maybe, in the subconscious of the uni-mind of Marvel Comics, is the understanding that Luke Cage may unfortunately always be a relevant fantasy idea for the Black man.

2012 – Trayvon Martin is shot and killed.

2013 – Jonathan Ferrell is shot and killed.

2014 – Michael Brown is shot and killed.

2015/2016 – Luke Cage premieres on Netflix.

I look forward to seeing if the Luke Cage of that show will have a true understanding of his power and what he symbolizes.

” —

Real Life Proves Why Luke Cage Endures (via comicberks)

Reading that was like getting kicked in the gut. And yet it feels like that’s not enough.

(via optimysticals)

Good logic here. 

(Source: fyeahlilbit3point0, via uncannybrettwhite)

Aug 15

[video]

Aug 14

After seeing Guardians of the Galaxy, I leaned over to Meggan and said, “I want a dancing Groot for Christmas.” That must be a thing you’ll be putting out, right agentmlovestacos? 

After seeing Guardians of the Galaxy, I leaned over to Meggan and said, “I want a dancing Groot for Christmas.” That must be a thing you’ll be putting out, right agentmlovestacos

Anonymous said: I feel so useless sitting here. What can I do to help Ferguson??

natnovna:

there’s a bail and legal fund that’s been set up for those who’ve been arrested 

this person is trying to organize a food drive for school kids in ferguson

national moment of silence 2014 (for victims of police brutality) 

share the following: 

videos of what has happened

links to articles

how to make a tear gas mask

livestream link to the peaceful protests

“Sir James Jeans, British astronomer and physicist, suggested that the universe was beginning to look more like a great thought than a great machine. Humanists seized on the expression, but it was hardly news. We knew, looking around, that a thought branches and leafs, a tree comes to a conclusion. But the question of who is thinking the thought is more fruitful than the question of who made teh machine, for a machinist can of course wipe his hands and leave, and his simple machine still hums; but if the thinker’s attention strays for a minute, his simplest thought ceases altogether. And, as a I have stressed, the place where we so incontrovertibly find ourselves, whether thought or machine, is at least not in any way simple.” — Annie Dillard, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.

[video]

Aug 13

brianmichaelbendis:

Amazing Spider-Man #262, March 1985,[.]

I was just re-reading this issue the other day.
When I was a kid, I thought this was an actual episode of the tv series, but then realized that this guy, Scott Leva, never actually made it to the screen, but was involved in a film adaptation coming from Cannon Films in 1985.

brianmichaelbendis:

Amazing Spider-Man #262, March 1985,[.]

I was just re-reading this issue the other day.

When I was a kid, I thought this was an actual episode of the tv series, but then realized that this guy, Scott Leva, never actually made it to the screen, but was involved in a film adaptation coming from Cannon Films in 1985.

(Source: comicbookcovers, via joekeatinge)

Aug 07

Yes, we are still here! -

We’ve started sending out newsletters. They’ll come out once a month and if you want to read the first one, you can at the link above. Warning: it’s very personal.

adkmogul:

The all-new, all different, (but still the same people) newsletter is available to read online: 

Good evening, Astronauts. 


Some of you may have been wondering what we’ve been up to, well here is currently what is happening in the worlds of ADK Mogul co-founders T.J. Brearton and Dave Press. 

One correction though: Survivors is no longer free on Amazon Kindle, but $3.99. You should totally check it out.

Aug 06

“It’s OK not to be a genius, whatever that is, if there even is such a thing…the creative life may or may not be the apex of human civilization, but either way it’s not what I thought it was. It doesn’t make you special and sparkly. You don’t have to walk alone. You can work in an office — I’ve worked in offices for the past 15 years and written five novels while doing it. The creative life is forgiving: You can betray it all you want, again and again, and no matter how many times you do, it will always take you back.” —

Lev Grossman manages to smash “you don’t have to be a genius” and “keep your day job” into his great essay, "How Not to Write a Novel" (his book, The Magician’s Land, is out this week).

Good advice.

(Source: annajarzab, via austinkleon)