I write about nerdy things, and celebrate those things as a college writing teacher. I live in the mountains and co-founded the production house ADK Mogul.
cameron-stewart:

FIGHT CLUB 2 Promotional image. Art by me, colour by Dave Stewart.  I am the artist of the official comic book sequel to the original Fight Club novel. The comic is written by Chuck Palahniuk himself, and debuts in May of 2015 as a 10-issue limited series.  More details here.

I’m so psyched for this.

cameron-stewart:

FIGHT CLUB 2 Promotional image. Art by me, colour by Dave Stewart.  I am the artist of the official comic book sequel to the original Fight Club novel. The comic is written by Chuck Palahniuk himself, and debuts in May of 2015 as a 10-issue limited series.  More details here.

I’m so psyched for this.

(via anniewu)

This isn’t technology being empowering. This is the literal *least* that technology could do. This is the opposite of consumer choice - because at the end of the day, when you’ve been working and you sit down, we’ve learned that the ability to choose and to discern and to exercise willpower and restraint and, bluntly, to concentrate, are fixed and deteriorate through the day. So no, this isn’t helping. This is externalisation of cost. This is shirking of responsibility. This is not using technology the way it *should* be used, or the way it *could* be used, but the way that it can be used to inflict maximum possible harm - to provide the illusion of choice without actually enabling *better choices*. And it fucking disgusts me.

Dan Hon in his newsletter, which I found through warrenellis's Morning Computer daily log.

By creating quality comics of powerful female superheroes, the comic book world is opening up to a new audience of women and girls as well as giving already hooked fans more of the powerful women they’ve come to know and love.

DC Comics, another major player in comics, has also joined the trend of bringing female characters to the forefront. It has “Wonder Woman” flying solo in a self-titled series, as well as “Supergirl” and even Batman characters like “Batgirl,” “Catwoman” and “Harley Quinn.”

The above (from the Huffington Post) is a sign of why good PR is important, and why DC really, really needs to step up on the issue of diversity in superhero comics.

In a story using the new Thor as a hook, DC merits a “has also joined the trend of bringing female characters to the forefront,” instead of the more accurate “DC led the trend, with seven ongoing titles out of its 2011 relaunch featuring female solo leads at a time when Marvel only had two ongoing female solo leads,” with DC’s number not dropping below seven since then while Marvel managed to reach a point later that year where it has zero ongoing series featuring female leads

The HuffPo piece (and this Daily Beast piece from the weekend) point out not just how well the Marvel Hype Machine works these days in framing the narrative but almost more importantly just how badly DC does the same thing (It also points out how eagerly journalists for major news outlets eat up talking points instead of going out and researching things sometimes, but that’s neither here nor there).

In all of the news about the replacement Captain America, it’s surprising that no-one — myself included — brought up that DC has had a black Superman for the last few months in Earth-2 (or longer, if you want to look at Grant Morrison’s continued use of the Superman from Earth-23). With all the push about diversity in Marvel, no-one pointed out that the publisher doesn’t have a solo gay lead, whereas DC’s been putting Batwoman out there for the last three years (Not to mention Green Lantern in Earth-2 or Constantine, who’s bi, I think? He was in Hellblazer, but who can tell in the New 52?).

These are all alternate talking points that DC could (should?) be pushing out there in order to point out that, really, it’s not got a “crisis” or playing catch-up; it’s been there for some time, but not making the same kind of look at us look at us we have friends who aren’t white straight males noises as Marvel whenever it makes these decisions. But, instead, they just sit back and… I don’t know. Hope that someone notices?

(All of which shouldn’t be taken as a “Marvel, you are terrible,” or whatever — it’s not, and its PR machine is very good at what it does — but as a “DC, at this point, you’re practically causing your own bad press.”)

Ramble, ramble…

(via graemem)

And the second of the two.

(via waitwhatpod)

Uh, yup to all of this.

(via waitwhatpod)

Signed up for BookBub, and immediately this website knows me too well. I picked up ruckawriter's ALPHA. 

Signed up for BookBub, and immediately this website knows me too well. I picked up ruckawriter's ALPHA. 

(Source: bookbub.com)

shihlun:

Susan Sontag


Typically, this is the skin I wear when it’s cocktail hour. Have a good weekend!

shihlun:

Susan Sontag

Typically, this is the skin I wear when it’s cocktail hour. Have a good weekend!

(Source: communicants, via aleskot)

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: A McSweeney’s Books Preview of Sean Wilsey’s More Curious.

My traveling companions were a dog named Charlie Chaplin and an architect named Michael Meredith. Michael and I became friends in Marfa—where the minimalist artist Donald Judd exiled himself in the 1970s from the “harsh and glib” New York art scene—in 2000, when he was in town designing a house for Judd’s longtime companion, Marianne Stockebrand, and my wife Daphne and I were guests of an arts foundation, each working on a book. Michael left for a teaching job back east, and Daphne and I stayed on—that’s when I saw the truck, in front of the post office: boxy, banged up, covered in sky-blue house paint, half-smashed windshield a lattice of stars and linear cracks, like a flag. A Mexican man in his sixties walked outside with his mail (smoking a cigar, wearing a cowboy hat) and drove it away. I biked around town till I found it parked out by the cemetery, around the corner from the beauty parlor. Jesse Santisteban, the owner, said I could take a closer look. The doors had handmade wooden armrests, and the seat belts were canvas and chain link. There was orange shag on the floorboards. He opened the hood and showed me the spot in the engine compartment where he’d signed it like an artist. I asked if he’d ever thought of selling. He said, “Never thought of selling.” Then he told me he had kidney stones and needed an operation.
Without even thinking I offered him $1,200.

nedhepburn convinced me, while wondering through Strand Bookstore years ago, to buy Wilsey’s Oh The Glory of It All, which was about Wilsey growing up with his socialite mother and the various ne’er-do-wells of San Francisco high society. I figured why not, the book was five dollars. When I was home that summer, I burned through it and it helped me through what was a difficult time. My mother read it and she loved it too. I forgot about Wilsey until yesterday when I saw this pop up in my Feedly, so now I’m excited to check out what he’s been up to in the years since his first and only book. 

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: A McSweeney’s Books Preview of Sean Wilsey’s More Curious.

My traveling companions were a dog named Charlie Chaplin and an architect named Michael Meredith. Michael and I became friends in Marfa—where the minimalist artist Donald Judd exiled himself in the 1970s from the “harsh and glib” New York art scene—in 2000, when he was in town designing a house for Judd’s longtime companion, Marianne Stockebrand, and my wife Daphne and I were guests of an arts foundation, each working on a book. Michael left for a teaching job back east, and Daphne and I stayed on—that’s when I saw the truck, in front of the post office: boxy, banged up, covered in sky-blue house paint, half-smashed windshield a lattice of stars and linear cracks, like a flag. A Mexican man in his sixties walked outside with his mail (smoking a cigar, wearing a cowboy hat) and drove it away. I biked around town till I found it parked out by the cemetery, around the corner from the beauty parlor. Jesse Santisteban, the owner, said I could take a closer look. The doors had handmade wooden armrests, and the seat belts were canvas and chain link. There was orange shag on the floorboards. He opened the hood and showed me the spot in the engine compartment where he’d signed it like an artist. I asked if he’d ever thought of selling. He said, “Never thought of selling.” Then he told me he had kidney stones and needed an operation.

Without even thinking I offered him $1,200.

nedhepburn convinced me, while wondering through Strand Bookstore years ago, to buy Wilsey’s Oh The Glory of It All, which was about Wilsey growing up with his socialite mother and the various ne’er-do-wells of San Francisco high society. I figured why not, the book was five dollars. When I was home that summer, I burned through it and it helped me through what was a difficult time. My mother read it and she loved it too. I forgot about Wilsey until yesterday when I saw this pop up in my Feedly, so now I’m excited to check out what he’s been up to in the years since his first and only book. 

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

wheelr:

guttersnipercomics:

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

This is in fact the format I use, and one that I know is being passed around by writers both professional and aspiring. It’s an excellent, intuitive format.

austinkleon:

Photographs of writers at work.

Note how many standing desks! See also a great book on the subject, The Writer’s Desk.

Filed under: work spaces

Continuing in my collection too. Love Vonnegut’s office.

Chris Sims on Mark Waid’s The Flash run.

I love this video, and I’m doing a similar thing for my Introduction to Graphic Novels class as an intro to every week’s discussion. 

adkmogul:

From Film Forum to Filmmaking:

The story of how a student from Marist became a Fulbright Scholarship recipient and an international filmmaker.
It all began for filmmaker Nick Homler at the 2012 Lake Placid Film Forum. As a Marist College student participating in the Sleepless in Lake Placid 24-hr Student Filmmaking Competition, Nick attended a panel discussion the morning after his film showcased at a screening along with several other participating school teams. The panel discussion “Do Movie Theaters Have A Future?” sparked the idea of a senior thesis capping video on the digital conversion of movie theatre projection. The next year, “Coffee and Conversation,” a keynote presentation from producer and educator Ira Deutchman, convinced Nick to move forward with a documentary he called “The Shared Experience.” Now Nick is taking the project to New Zealand on a Fulbright Scholarship. Here’s Nick writing a guest post for us, telling the story in his own words.

Congratulations to Nick and thank you for the kind words. Have a blast in New Zealand.  

It is such a joy to see a competitor in the student competition I help organize take off and do some really great work. I can’t wait to see the final cut of Nick’s The Shared Experience. 

adkmogul:

From Film Forum to Filmmaking:

The story of how a student from Marist became a Fulbright Scholarship recipient and an international filmmaker.

It all began for filmmaker Nick Homler at the 2012 Lake Placid Film Forum. As a Marist College student participating in the Sleepless in Lake Placid 24-hr Student Filmmaking Competition, Nick attended a panel discussion the morning after his film showcased at a screening along with several other participating school teams. The panel discussion “Do Movie Theaters Have A Future?” sparked the idea of a senior thesis capping video on the digital conversion of movie theatre projection. The next year, “Coffee and Conversation,” a keynote presentation from producer and educator Ira Deutchman, convinced Nick to move forward with a documentary he called “The Shared Experience.” Now Nick is taking the project to New Zealand on a Fulbright Scholarship. Here’s Nick writing a guest post for us, telling the story in his own words.

Congratulations to Nick and thank you for the kind words. Have a blast in New Zealand.  

It is such a joy to see a competitor in the student competition I help organize take off and do some really great work. I can’t wait to see the final cut of Nick’s The Shared Experience